How Paul Mampilly Explains The Inverted Yield Curve Phenomenon

Paul Mampilly has often had experts wondering how he can see things in the stock market nobody else can, especially since he owned stock in several pharmaceutical companies and sold them for huge profits after they exploded with growth. Paul Mampilly predict the dot-com bubble of 1999 and unsustainable growth in the housing market right before the crash of 2008, and now he’s looking at an inverted yield curve in the stock market. The factors going into this curve are complex, but usually it’s something that shows up when the US Treasury Bond index is indicating signs of economic slowdown. Mampilly however, believes it’s something very different than your usual recession. What Paul Mampilly says is actually going on is deflation driven by economic activity as opposed to economic slowdown.

Many companies that are using advanced technology are driving prices way down and making it tough for some of the longtime companies still doing things the old way to compete in the markets. Paul Mampilly has told his stock investors the keys to finding good stocks to buy are looking at the kind of innovations companies are putting out. Artificial Intelligence, robotics, blockchain and internet of things trends are the primary innovations right now. But also millennials interests are driving the market. Paul Mampilly is a former big hedge fund manager who decided it was time to go a different direction even when most would have considered their careers just beginning. He came to the US as an immigrant student, and after graduating he became a portfolio research assistant at Banker’s Trust.

He quickly was promoted and held management positions in banking for more than 10 years. But it was taking over a hedge fund in 2006 and making investments for clients there that really made Mampilly the talk of Wall Street. He saw the fund’s portfolio bring in 26℅ in annual returns, and even on the side he took $50 million he was given and invested it in solid stocks that grew it to $88 million, even though this was all done during the recession. Even though Paul Mampilly liked the finance world, he felt he was missing valuable time with his family that he needed. So he stepped down and took up independent research and writing that he could do on his own time. But along with giving him more family time, he realized he could now help people who had less savings than the top 1℅ and give them good advice for building portfolios on their own. Mampilly investment advice through both free and paid newsletters and articles can be found at BanyanHill.